• europe,  SZ,  the netherlands,  unesco world heritage

    The windmills at Kinderdijk

    The typical Holland windmills at Kinderdijk. Just half an hour drive from Rotterdam, one of the largest cities in The Netherlands and well worth a visit, you find the windmills at Kinderdijk. We made a stop on our way south from our extended stay in Amsterdam. It was on our way home and Unesco Worldheritage, so the ideal stop for us to spend a few hours. Kinderdijk has 19 traditional windmills, alongside a canal. Combine that with the green meadows surrounding them and you have Holland at its best. These windmills have been used to dry out parts of the surrounding lands and are one of the examples of The…

  • asia,  nepal,  unesco world heritage

    10 amazing World Heritage sites of Nepal

    A bundle of phenomenal scenic beauties, Nepal is a place of paradise. Ranging from mighty mountains to subtle hills and grassy plains, Nepal comprises of everything that is there to see in this world. Nepal is a small landlocked country that happens to be one of the places richest in freshwater bodies. It probably has a higher number of heritage sites than cinema theaters. As a matter of fact, you might find it difficult to watch a movie here, but not the mountains. And surprisingly, there are more gods than people as a consequence of which Nepal has a diverse range of cultures and traditions whose existential differences are collectively acknowledged…

  • europe,  slovenia,  SZ,  unesco world heritage

    Most impressive cave contest: Postojna Cave vs. Škocjan Caves.

    Recently, we shared the story of our visit to the astonishing Postojna Cave (Postojnska jama), in our quest to find the most impressive cave system of Europe. Even though we haven’t visited many caves before, we consider it nearly impossible for any other cave to be as fantastic as those we visited in Slovenia. The Postojna Cave made quite a lasting impression on us, to say the least. However, the day after our visit, we went to the Škocjan Caves and that turned out to be an exceptional experience as well. Half a year later, reflecting on our holiday in Slovenia, I thought it would be interesting to compare the two, using…

  • citytrip,  europe,  GL,  italy,  modena,  unesco world heritage

    A lovely walk through Modena…

    We visited the Italian island of Sardegna (Sardinia) in the summer of 2013. We combined our stay there with a roadtrip from our home in Belgium to the island (and back), passing through France, Switzerland, and Italy. Along the way, we visited a number of world heritage sites and every evening we stayed with a different couchsurfing host. The day before we had to take the ferry to Sardegna, we arrived at Modena. I must admit it was a city we didn’t really know much about, except for the fact that it has a UNESCO-listed cathedral and tower. We decided to let it surprise us, and it did! It was…

  • europe,  GL,  italy,  unesco world heritage

    The nuraghi of Sardegna…

    Despite its rather isolated position in the Mediterranean (together with Corsica), Sardinia (Sardegna in Italian) has a long history of human presence. First settlement occurred somewhere between 450000-150000 years ago, by people from Tuscany, by a landstrip via Corsica. The first significant Sardinian civilisation was the Nuragic civilisation, which existed between 1700 BC and 500BC (although some part of the culture appears to have survived as long as 500AD, if I understand correctly). At least we can say it arose in the Bronze Age period. Although this civilisation has left Sardegna with several types of remains (amongst which Tombe dei Giganti or Giant’s graves, dolmen etc…), the nuraghi stand out…

  • europe,  germany,  GL,  unesco world heritage

    Between a sausage and a smiling angel: a hot day in Regensburg.

    If there is one thing we learned from our visit to Trier last year, it is that the Romans have been doing some serious construction and city-building in once-Germania. A considerable number of German cities still contain original and well-preserved Roman architecture. The Romans’ never-ending thirst for conquering new tribes and annexing new lands eventually led them into the northern lands of the Germanic tribes. Around the first and second century AD, the Roman Empire reached its largest expanse under emperor Traianus. At this time, the northern border of the Empire consisted of the Rhine and Danube river system. Along those rivers, a number of important forts and, later, cities,…

  • africa,  egypt,  unesco world heritage

    The temples of Luxor and Karnak

    A young, happy me in the temple complex of Karnak. You can see the Hypostyle hall in the back (left).  Back in 1999 I was in my senior year of high school. We could choose our senior trip ourselves. It had to be something educational, and the whole class needed to attend the trip. After some brainstorming, we came up with Egypt. And so it was that we set off to discover the temples along the Nile between Luxor & Aswan. It was my first big trip abroad. I had only ever left the safety of Belgium and the Netherlands once, to go to Santorini in Greece with my godfather. Needless to…

  • AF,  england,  europe,  unesco world heritage

    Canterbury cathedral

    When you arrive in Canterbury, you will find the Cathedral in the middle of the city centre, behind a small entrance. It hides behind some buildings and you can only really view it when you pay the entrance fee. Which is something you really should do, because it is one of the most impressive cathedrals we have ever seen. Maarten visited the cathedral when he was younger, and he mostly remembers its perpendicular style. The whole cathedral is dominated by vertical lines. I loved the cathedral and the cosy town of Canterbury around it. Both the interior and the outside of the building are impressive and I love the ruins…

  • europe,  germany,  GL,  unesco world heritage

    Upper Middle Rhein valley

    The famous Loreley rock. To be completely honest, our experience with the Rhine valley consisted of two separate visits. We visited Koblenz on a sunny afternoon and enjoyed every bit of it: taking some time at highlights such as the Vier Turme, Alte Burg, Florinskirche and St.-Kastor Basilica, eating delicious ice cream on the Am Plan Square and strolling around in a relaxed way until we finally reached the Deutsches Eck, where the Rhine and the Moselle converge. It was a great, sunny day and the water playground near the Deutsches Eck was big fun for the kids! A few days later, the weather was much colder, with rain and…

  • citytrip,  europe,  germany,  GL,  koln,  unesco world heritage

    Köln

    The Dom of Cologne, a gothic masterpiece, took 6 (!) centuries to be completed. During all this time, the builders stuck to the original plans. The place where the cathedral was built has been a place for catholic worship since the 4th century. The Dom is the first building you see when coming out of the train station. And it is an impressive sight! I visited the cathedral a couple of times and even climbed the stairs to the top. A magnificent view over Cologne and its surroundings was the welcome reward! Well worth a visit! Although the Dom itself is certainly a highlight in this city, we would love…