• antarctica

    Jubany: a research station on King George Island.

    Sometimes the most memorable travel memories are made when you least expect them. Even when you think things are completely heading in the wrong direction, something spectacular might happen eventually. In November 2007, I got stuck on an Argentinian military base for almost 2 weeks (all about that unfortunate chain of events here), awaiting a transfer to Jubany, an Argentinian-German research base where I was supposed to conduct my research on Antarctic marine worms. Getting stranded on another Antarctic island was definitely not part of the plan, and I really wanted to get out of that place (the base was seriously dull and I desperately wanted to start my research in Jubany asap). Fortunately, I…

  • antarctica,  Argentina,  South America

    A few days in Buenos Aires

    I am a high school science teacher for 8 years now, but before my career in education I used to work as a marine biologist, doing research for the Marine Biology Section of Ghent University in Belgium. After my PhD about coral reefs, I started working for a small Belgian project dealing with Antarctic marine biodiversity, called BIANZO. I was studying microscopic, benthic (= sea-bottom) nematodes (roundworms) and their quick response on changes in our climate and their polar environment. In order to take the necessary samples for my research, I first joined a large number of fellow scientists on a 3-month sampling campaign on the German RV Polarstern, between November 2006 and Februari…

  • africa,  south africa,  unesco world heritage

    The Great White and beyond: Hermanus and Gansbaai, South Africa.

    South Africa is a popular travel destination for a number of reasons. Since we went there this (European) summer (i.e. SA winter), we are starting to understand why. I think it is the combination of wildlife (safari), stunning landscapes, culture (from wood carvings to braai (= SA barbecue)), history (both ancient and recent) and delicious food and drinks (including Stellenbosch’s wines and the omnipresent biltong (= dried meat)) that makes this country worth a visit every moment of the year. South-African summer (October to February) is still the most popular period for tourists and travelers, although winter in SA also has a lot to offer! One of the highlights of…

  • kidstravel,  traveling families

    Traveling families: Eric Stoen

    Eric Stoen, or Travelbabbo on Instagram, is one of my all time favourite travelbloggers to follow. He is almost always on the road, often taking his kids with him. He invented #takeyourkidseverywhere and travels to the most beautiful places on our planet. He’s a busy man, so I was very honoured that he wanted to take time out to answer our questions about traveling with children. He’s the last contributor to our series.  Names: Eric Stoen Blog: http://travelbabbo.com/ Full-time travelers or part-time travelers: We’re part-time travelers. We’ll pull the kids out of school occasionally, but most of our travel is during school breaks. Do you always take your kids along on your travels? No.…

  • africa,  capetown,  citytrip,  kidstravel,  south africa,  unesco world heritage

    Cape Town (and its surroundings) in three days and a 1000 impressions.

    After more than 24 hours of traveling between airports (Brussels-Madrid-Johannesburg-Cape Town), we finally arrived at CPT (Cape Town International Airport) around 5PM. Being August, thus South-African winter, the sun was already setting when we set off with our rental car towards our hostel in Cape Town’s Green Point. There were a number of hindrances that complicated us getting there: an unfamiliar car (I didn’t discover my 1st and 2nd gear until the next morning), driving on the “wrong” (left) side of the road, darkness falling, no gps, and taking the wrong exit. Moreover, we had read that Cape Town is one of the most dangerous cities in the world, and some…

  • Bucket list

    In January 2014 we decided to write down our travel bucket list: a list of all places and experiences we would like to cross out sooner or later. For the new website we decided to change how we order them. Rather than organising them per continent, we divided them into categories. If you see a hyperlink on one of our items, that means we visited & blogged about it! A date next to it, but no link, means we covered it, but yet have to blog about it! If only one of us has covered a certain item, our name is added between brackets. So: here we go! – Visit…